Home KISWAHILI KISWAHILI STUDY NOTES FOR ORDINARY LEVEL (FORM 1 – 4)

KISWAHILI STUDY NOTES FOR ORDINARY LEVEL (FORM 1 – 4)

930
1
SHARE
Kiswahili Study Notes Form 5 and 6 | Kiswahili Kidato cha 5 na 6 KISWAHILI KIDATO CHA 5 NA 6 STUDY NOTES KISWAHILI KIDATO CHA 5 NA 6 STUDY NOTE KISWAHILI STUDY NOTES FOR ORDINARY LEVEL (FORM 1 - 4)

KISWAHILI STUDY NOTES FOR ORDINARY LEVEL (FORM 1 – 4)

NOTES ZA KIWAHILI | KISWAHILI O’LEVEL | NOTES ZA KISWAHILI KIDATO CHA I | NOTES ZA KISWAHILI KIDATO CHA II | NOTES ZA KISWAHILI KIDATO CHA III | NOTES ZA KISWAHILI KIDATO CHA IV | NOTES ZA KISWAHILI FORM I – IV | KISWAHILI NOTES

KISWAHILI STUDY NOTES FOR ORDINARY LEVEL (FORM 1 – 4):- Swahili (or Kiswahili) is a musical language and quite easy to learn, whose origins date back more than 1,000 years, and it is spoken along the eastern coast of Africa.

It developed when African-Bantu and Arab-Persian elements came into contact, spreading progressively throughout the continent as a trade language along the routes traveled by caravans that departed from the ports of Zanzibar, Bagamoyo, and Kilwa, heading into the heart of Africa in search of gold, ivory, and slaves.

The name Swahili derives from the Arabic word “Sahel”, which means “coast”, precisely because the language and culture produced were found in the early settlements established by Arab and Shirazi traders along the shores of the Indian Ocean.

Notes za Kiswahili

  • Notes za kiswahili kidato cha kwanza
  • Notes za kiswahili kidato cha pili
  • Notes za kiswahili kidato cha tatu
  • Notes za kiswahili kidato cha nne
  • Notes za kiswahili kidato cha tano
  • Notes za kiswahili kidato cha sita
See also  HISTORY FORM ONE FULL NOTES

Initially written in Arabic characters, when Christian missionaries arrived they transliterated it, introducing the use of the Latin alphabet.

Kiswahili Study Notes For Ordinary Level (Form 1 - 4)

Over the centuries it has been enriched by Portuguese, German and, above all, English contributions.

Like all other languages of the Bantu family, it has a different logic to the European languages we are accustomed to using.

There are no masculine, feminine or neutral genders, but 19 noun classes corresponding to 19 verb/pronoun classes, and 19 adjective classes.

Unlike Western languages, Swahili does not change suffixes (the ends of words), but the prefixes (the beginnings of words).

KISWAHILI STUDY NOTES FOR ORDINARY LEVEL (FORM 1 – 4)

In order to view this notes of kiswhili please click on link below;

KISWAHILI KIDATO CHA KWANZA
KISWAHILI KIDATO CHA PILI
KISWAHILI KIDATO CHA TATU
KISWAHILI KIDATO CHA NNE
Download our APP from Google Playstore using the link
CLICK HERE
Join Our Telegram Group for Daily Updates
CLICK HERE

1 COMMENT

  1. Enjoyed reading this, very good stuff, appreciate it. “Nothing happens to any thing which that thing is not made by nature to bear.” by Marcus Aurelius Antoninus.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here