Home SYLLABUS SCHEMES OF WORK FOR PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS

SCHEMES OF WORK FOR PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS

111
0
SCHEMES OF WORK FOR PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS

SCHEMES OF WORK FOR PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS

SCHEMES OF WORK | SCHEMES OF WORK BASED ON NEW CALENDAR | SCHEMES OF WORK FOR O-LEVEL | SCHEMES OF WORK FORM 1- 4 ALL SUBJECTS | Schemes of Work Primary School | Schemes of Work Secondary School | Download Schemes of Work for Free

What is a scheme of work?

A scheme of work is a kind of plan that outlines all the learning to be covered over a given period of time (usually a term or a whole school year).

For independent schools, the content of a scheme of work is left largely up to individual teachers and the head of the department, whereas in state-sponsored schools, they’re designed to cover the National Curriculum learning outcomes.

What is the difference between a syllabus and a scheme of work?

For non-teachers, the difference between a syllabus and a scheme of work might be a little trickier to grasp, so here’s a short explanation:

<> A syllabus is a document outlining which topics and skills are to be covered for a subject. In England, the National Curriculum is the document that teachers at all state-sponsored schools are required to teach from and adhere to. One advantage of following the National Curriculum is that it’s easy to find resources for your lessons.

<> A scheme of work, on the other hand, outlines how the curriculum will be taught. This includes things like the order of lessons, what weighting will be given to each topic (in terms of teaching hours), and any assessment activities, if they’re deemed necessary.

So, whereas all state-sponsored schools adhere to the same curriculum, they may have different schemes of learning. If you’re wondering why children at another school seem to be learning different things, then this is probably why.

The main function of a scheme of work is to help teachers plan and sequence their lessons in advance. That way, they can make sure that all course content is taught before the school year ends, and that the National Curriculum aims are covered.

Another function of a scheme of work is that they help teachers to consider and make the most of the resources at their disposal. For those not in the know, a teaching resource is anything that’s used to engage children in learning.

That could be anything from a PowerPoint to an activity sheet. By organising lessons in this way beforehand, teachers can make sense of what they’ve got, and what they still need to make.

See also  BASELINE ORIENTATION COURSE FORM ONE

What should a scheme of work include?

Here’s a list of things you might want to consider when you’re designing it:

1. An outline of what will be covered, and in which lessons.

2. References to the curriculum you’ve chosen to cover.

3. A list of resources and activities to be used in lessons.

4. Guidance on best teaching methods for covering certain areas.

5. Room to grow and evolve as the department or school changes.

IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS TO BE BORN IN MIND WHEN PREPARING A SCHEME OF WORK:

Understanding the syllabus.

The classroom teacher may not necessarily be involved in the initial stages of curriculum development, but (s)he is expected to interpret the curriculum and implement it correctly.

This calls for a thorough understanding of the syllabus and the content, in order to achieve the stated objectives. The teacher is expected to act like a policeman or a judge who is called upon to administer the law though he did not make it.

It is therefore very important that the teacher be thoroughly conversant with the curriculum in order to implement it successfully.

Preceding and succeeding syllabus content

In most cases topics from the syllabus may not be arranged in the order in which they are supposed to be taught. Some topics will require the knowledge of the previous ones while others are quite independent.

The teacher should not only identify the essential learning content but also arrange the content in logical teaching order considering the proceeding and succeeding syllabus content.

Syllabus contents of related subject:

The mistake which many teachers make is to scheme for their subject without considering the contents of related subjects. This is very wrong and should be highly discouraged.

Quite often the teaching of a given topic, in a given subject may be impeded by lack of skills or knowledge to be acquired in a different subject.

Existing scheme of work for the subject

If a scheme of work is already available for the subject, it would be a waste of effort and time for the teacher to break new ground again. In this case, the teacher can revise the existing scheme to suit his/her students and to bring it up to date.

Reference material and examination

The teacher should be familiar with reference material that is available for effective coverage of the topics in the scheme of work.

There is nothing more disturbing than finding out that a topic that is already covered could have been more interesting, enjoyable and even better understood if certain materials or teaching aids that are available in school had been utilised.

See also  Syllabus for Secondary Schools Form 5 and 6

The type of examination the students are being prepared for should bear in mind that some levels require more revision time than others and therefore, scheme for revision appropriately.

Time estimation

Although there are 13 weeks in one term, it is not usually possible to use all these for effective teaching for a variety of reasons. For purposes of determining how much material can be covered in any given time, it would be misleading to assume that a subject requiring 9 periods per week has 6 x 13 periods available for teaching.

The number of effective teaching periods varies according to both predictable and unpredictable interruptions. Effective teaching time must therefore be estimated before topics are selected. The most common interruptions that are likely to disrupt a scheme of work include:

1. Public Holidays

2. Examinations (should be schemed for) if they are internal

3. Revisions (should be schemed for)

4. Open days

5. Sports days

6. Planned school breaks e.g. mid-term break e.t.c.

The teacher/instructor should check with the administration of the school or Youth Polytechnic dates for such events before scheming. Although the new syllabuses under the 8-4-4 framework give time estimation for each topic, these should be taken as guidelines only. Finer adjustments need to be made depending on the time available for teaching.

Description of Components Of Schemes Of Work

1. Competence: Is a statement which specifies the ability that is expected to be exhibited by learners after they have gone through the topic(s) for a given class.
  • It derived from the syllabus.
  • One competence can be build by a combination of subtopics and specific objectives.

2. Objectives: These are statements which specify the behavior to be showed by the learners. these statements are derived from the topic in the syllabus.

3. Month: Is a column that indicate the month in which the topic will be taught.

4. Week: Is a column that indicates the week in which topic or subtopic will be taught.

5. Main topic: This column indicates the topics which will be taught in that particular month.

6. Sub topic: This specifies the area/ subtopic of the topic to be covered.

7. Periods: A column that indicates number of periods budgeted for a particular topic or subtopic.

See also  Syllabus for Technical Secondary School Education ~ Form I-IV

8. Teaching activities: A column that indicates a list of operational activities which will carried out by the teacher in the process of teaching a particular topic or subtopic.

9. Learning activities: A column that indicates activities which the learner will perform in the process of learning a particular topic or subtopic.

10. Teaching/learning resources or materials: A column that indicates a list of teaching aids that will be used to facilitate teaching and learning a particular topic or sub topic.

11. References: A column which indicates a list of textbooks, supplementary books or any other resources that will be used in teaching and learning a particular topic/subtopic.

12. Assessment: A column which indicates the kind of assessment that students will be subjected to. This will ensure that assessment of learners as well as process of teaching and even the materials used are assessed so as to allow for improvement in future.

13. Remarks: A column used by the teacher to fill his/her comments about how far the topic/specific objectives have been achieved as well as appropriateness of materials and process.

IMPORTANCE OF SHEME OF WORK

1. Helps to plan for future teaching.

2. Remind teachers on the covered topics.

3. It helps teachers to teach content within a given period of time.

4. It helps the teacher to regulate speed of teaching.

5. It enables the teacher to teach systematically.

6. It help the teacher to prepare lesson plan

7. It is useful during handing over of teachers.

8. It helps the teacher to be confident when planning for teaching.

SCHEMES OF WORK FOR PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS

A: PRIMARY | MSINGI SCHEMES OF WORK

PRIMARY SCHOOL STD I – VII | SHULE YA MSINGI

B: O’LEVEL ALL SUBJECTS SCHEMES OF WORK

1. FORM ONE ALL SUBJECTS SCHEMES OF WORK 2022
2. FORM TWO ALL SUBJECTS SCHEMES OF WORK 2022
3. FORM THREE ALL SUBJECTS SCHEMES OF WORK 2022
4. FORM FOUR ALL SUBJECTS SCHEMES OF WORK  2022

C: ADVANCED LEVEL ALL SCHEMES OF WORK

FORM FIVE AND SIX ALL SUBJECTS SCHEMES OF WORK 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here